Bridging the Gap: Why Aren’t Underrepresented Minorities Pursuing Careers in Interventional Radiology?

Presented During:

Wed, 3/27/2019: 3:00 PM  - 3:09 PM 
Austin Convention Center  
Room: 11  

Final ID:

344 

Type:

Original Scientific Research-Oral or Poster 

Poster Type:

Original Scientific Research-Oral or Poster 

Authors:

D Daye1, M Cedillo2, L Castro3, S Sullivan4, M Smith5, A Patel6, V Kumar7

Institutions:

1Massachusetts General Hospital, Medford, MA, 2Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY, 3N/A, Ponce, PR, 4Howard University College of Medicine, Washington, DC, 5N/A, N/A, 6Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, 7University of California, San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA

First Author:

Dania Daye, MD, PHD  
Massachusetts General Hospital
Medford, MA

Co-Author(s):

Mario A Cedillo, M.D.  
Mount Sinai Hospital
New York, NY
Lucía María Castro  
N/A
Ponce, PR
Shannon Allison Sullivan  
Howard University College of Medicine
Washington, DC
Matthew Smith  
N/A
N/A
Arjun Patel  
Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University
Greenville, NC
Vishal Kumar, MD  
University of California, San Francisco
SAN FRANCISCO, CA

Presenting Author:

Dania Daye, MD, PHD  
Massachusetts General Hospital
Medford, MA

Purpose:

The purpose of this study was to understand the attitudes and perceptions of underrepresented minority (URM) medical students towards Interventional Radiology (IR) and to identify the deterrents to pursuing careers in the field.

Materials:

In this IRB-approved prospective study, we surveyed medical students at 4 institutions that have been identified as having a high percentage of URM students. Unweighted descriptive summaries were calculated for all categorical variables. Chi-squared analysis was used to asses for statistically significant differences for categorical variables. To quantify the association between URM status and key survey items, a logistic regression model was constructed in which each dichotomized survey item was regressed on URM status. URM status was defined as students who are Hispanic or Latino, African American, Native American or Multiracial/Other.

Results:

A total of 353 responses were received. 65.3% were underrepresented minorities (39.2% African American; 19.3% Hispanic or Latino; 0.3% Native American; and 6.5% multiracial or other). Compared to non-URM medical students, URMs were less likely to agree that they understand what interventional radiologists do (OR=0.52, P=0.009) or that they know when to consult IR (OR=0.52, P=0.023). 59.2% indicated that they are not aware of opportunities for exposure to IR. Overall, 13% of all respondents indicated interest in pursuing IR, with no difference in interest between URMs and non-URMs (χ2=0.75; P=0.687). URMs were less likely to agree that long length of training (OR=0.58, P=0.029), or that required diagnostic radiology training (OR=0.52, P=0.042) were deterrents to pursuing IR. URMs were more likely to agree or answer neutrally that radiation exposure is a deterrent to pursuing a career in IR (OR=2.46, P=0.004).

Conclusions:

URM medical students are less likely to agree that they understand the role of interventional radiologists or when to consult IR and are more likely to consider radiation exposure as a deterrent to pursuing a career in the field. Implementation of targeted programming to increase exposure and education about IR for URMs is essential to increase their recruitment into the specialty.

Abstract Categories:

Education and Training

Keywords:

Diversity
inclusion