Are we there yet? Routes to drug delivery in IR

Final ID:

744 

Poster Type:

Traditional Poster 

Authors:

A Kilgore1, L Jamal1, T Parnall1, I Altun1, K Zurcher1, S Naidu1, G Knuttinen1, I Patel1, J Kriegshauser1, S Alzubaidi1, H Albadawi1, R Oklu1

Institutions:

1Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ

First Author:

Anthony Elijah Kilgore Jr  
Mayo Clinic Arizona
Phoenix, AZ

Co-Author(s):

Leila Jamal  
Mayo Clinic Arizona
Phoenix, AZ
Taylor Parnall  
Mayo Clinic Arizona
Phoenix, AZ
Izzet Altun  
Mayo Clinic Arizona
Phoenix, AZ
Kenneth Zurcher, MD  
Mayo Clinic Arizona
Phoenix, AZ
Sailendra G. Naidu, MD, FSIR  
Mayo Clinic Arizona
Phoenix, AZ
Grace Knuttinen  
Mayo Clinic Arizona
Phoenix, AZ
Indravadan J Patel, MD  
Mayo Clinic Arizona
Phoenix, AZ
J. Scott Kriegshauser, MD  
Mayo Clinic Arizona
Phoenix, AZ
Sadeer Alzubaidi, MD  
Mayo Clinic Arizona
Phoenix, AZ
Hassan Albadawi, MD  
Mayo Clinic Arizona
Phoenix, AZ
Rahmi Oklu, MD, PHD, FSIR  
Mayo Clinic Arizona
Phoenix, AZ

Poster Presenter:

Anthony Elijah Kilgore Jr  
Mayo Clinic School of Medicine- Arizona
Scottsdale, AZ

Presenting Author:

Anthony Elijah Kilgore Jr  
N/A
Scottsdale, AZ

Learning Objectives:

(1) recognize clinical applications of current drug delivery technology (2) understand the current landscape of endovascular drug delivery within interventional radiology (3) determine the most appropriate treatment options based on current guidelines.

Background:

The rising rate of peripheral artery disease in USA (8 million people annually) commands attention; critical limb claudication represents high morbidity. Although we have become more adept at revascularization of the lesion, preventing restenosis has proven difficult. If we are able to deliver target drugs endovascular route to prevent the inflammatory cycle leading to restenosis, our patient outcomes will improve and along with the value of care provided. Currently, several technologies exist to prevent restenosis, such as brachytherapy, rotational atherectomy, covered stents, drug-eluting stents (DES) and drug-covered balloons (DCB). DES and DCB are preferred when trialed versus alternate modalities. The main drugs currently are paclitaxel and -limus drugs. As of August 2019, the FDA has issued updated guidelines on paclitaxel stents usage. Developing newer stent materials, using polymers, iron, and magnesium alloys have been considered as alternative dissolvable stent materials. Also, the efficacy of these drugs has been optimized through excipients and polymers.

Clinical Findings/Procedure Details:

The mechanism of action of several drug delivery technologies, as well as diagrams explaining each technique, will be detailed on the poster. Ongoing trials regarding the novel therapies for restenosis treatment and prevention will be highlighted. We will conclude by addressing the role interventional radiologists have in the treatment and comparing it to more invasive surgical measures.

Conclusion and/or Teaching Points:

Drug delivery to targeted locations with consistent results are in need and being investigated. The drug needs to be long-lasting and provide a slow sustained release, balancing focal impacts vs systemic side effects. Future studies will continue to focus on the basic sciences necessary to develop drugs that will fulfill these aims

Abstract Categories:

Basic Science: Other

Keywords:

Drug delivery